Posts Tagged With: harvest

A Day at the Farm

So much fun!  Our weekend adventure of harvesting wheat and learning about where the ingredients in our pizza come from was a HUGE success!  Thanks so much to the Brays for hosting this awesome event; their farm was perfect.

Where Does Your Pizza Come From?  {DaddysTractor.com}

FSA brought coloring books and rulers.

Where Does Your Pizza Come From?  {DaddysTractor.com}

Our Farm Bureau agent helped kids plant their own seeds.

Where Does Your Pizza Come From?  {DaddysTractor.com}

This is me, showing how the harvested wheat is turned into flour.

Where Does Your Pizza Come From?  {DaddysTractor.com}

Grinding wheat with electricity was much easier than doing it by hand!

Where Does Your Pizza Come From?  {DaddysTractor.com}

These are beef cows for the hamburger toppings!

Where Does Your Pizza Come From?  {DaddysTractor.com}

And Nubian milk goats for making the mozzarella cheese.

Where Does Your Pizza Come From?  {DaddysTractor.com}

There was a straw maze.

Where Does Your Pizza Come From?  {DaddysTractor.com}

The sensory bin filled with wheat to play in!

Where Does Your Pizza Come From?  {DaddysTractor.com}

Where Does Your Pizza Come From?  {DaddysTractor.com}

Riding in the combine was probably the best part!

Where Does Your Pizza Come From?  {DaddysTractor.com}

Caroline waits for her turn to ride and sports a “Thank a Farmer” sticker!

Where Does Your Pizza Come From?  {DaddysTractor.com}

Finally, its Carson’s turn!

Where Does Your Pizza Come From?  {DaddysTractor.com}

Is this machine way cool or what?!

Where Does Your Pizza Come From?  {DaddysTractor.com}

The stalks from the wheat are baled into straw. These huge bales are being sold to the highway dept. to be used to keep dirt in place while workers fix roads.

Where Does Your Pizza Come From?  {DaddysTractor.com}

All right, maybe the pizza was the best part! Yummy!

Where Does Your Pizza Come From?  {DaddysTractor.com}

Pepperoni comes from hogs!

Where Does Your Pizza Come From?  {DaddysTractor.com}

Lovin’ the cheese!

Categories: Family | Tags: , , , , , , , | 2 Comments

Tomorrow’s the Big Day!

Ready to find out Where Your Pizza Comes From?!  Tomorrow’s the Big Day– combine rides, hay bales to climb on, and FREE PIZZA!

Come on out any time between 9:00-1:00 to the Bray Farm.  The weather looks GREAT for our event.  Since some of you may be wondering, yes, Brad and Minnie Bray welcomed a sweet baby girl last night (an Independence Day baby!) but we are all set to celebrate their new addition and combine their wheat for them! 😉  We can’t wait to see you!

Wheat Harvest

Directions to the Brays farm:

From the South:

From US Hwy 36 and Hwy 69 in Cameron: North on 69 1 mile.  69 Hwy curves right and EE blacktop forks off straight North.  Take EE 6 miles.  At 6 mile point EE curves right and Willow forks off straight North.  Take Willow Road North 1/2 mile and then curves to the left.  Continue on Willow for 2 miles until you get to Irwin.  On Irwin go 1/4 mile and arrive at 2966 SE Irwin Rd., Cameron MO 64429.  Enter at the 2nd Driveway.

From the North:

From Hwy 6 from Mayville going East to Weatherby: Take Irwin Rd. South (Irwin is the first gravel road west of Weatherby).  Go 2 1/2 miles to Valley.  Go right (west) on Valley 1/2 mils to Irwin.  Go left (south) on Irwin 1/2 mile to 2966 SE Irwin Rd., Cameron MO 64429.

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Its Almost Here! Where Does Your Pizza Come From Field Trip

It’s almost here!  The “Where Does Your Pizza Come From?” field trip is next Saturday, July 6th from 9:00-1:00 at the Bray Farm.  There will be goats to milk, a tractor to “drive,” wheat to grind, hay bales to climb, and a combine to ride!  The events scheduled are aimed at children entereing 2-6th grades, but this will be fun for the whole family!

And if that weren’t enough, there will be free pizza!

harvesting wheat

Directions to the Brays farm:

From the South:

From US Hwy 36 and Hwy 69 in Cameron: North on 69 1 mile.  69 Hwy curves right and EE blacktop forks off straight North.  Take EE 6 miles.  At 6 mile point EE curves right and Willow forks off straight North.  Take Willow Road North 1/2 mile and then curves to the left.  Continue on Willow for 2 miles until you get to Irwin.  On Irwin go 1/4 mile and arrive at 2966 SE Irwin Rd., Cameron MO 64429.  Enter at the 2nd Driveway.

From the North:

From Hwy 6 from Mayville going East to Weatherby: Take Irwin Rd. South (Irwin is the first gravel road west of Weatherby).  Go 2 1/2 miles to Valley.  Go right (west) on Valley 1/2 mils to Irwin.  Go left (south) on Irwin 1/2 mile to 2966 SE Irwin Rd., Cameron MO 64429.

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A Field Trip to a Farm

If you’re going to take a field trip, why not visit a field?!  DeKalb county Farm Bureau is once again sponsoring “Where Does Your Pizza Come From?” field trip to the farm!  Last year we had a lot of fun, but it rained so that put a damper on our plans.  Well, if at first you don’t succeed… we’re doing it again!

where does your pizza come from

If you can make the journey to the Cameron, Missouri area save Saturday, July 6th for a day to ride in the combine as it harvests wheat, milk a goat at learn how to make mozzarella cheese, pet beef cows, and get dirty!  We’ll be harvesting at the Bray’s farm– directions will be available soon!!

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Visit to the Farm

Last Saturday we enjoyed friends coming for a visit to the farm.  Like most families, these friends don’t have a combine in their backyard, so we had a grand time climbing up the ladders to look in the hopper, checking out the engine, riding around the field, “steering” the tractor and cart, and honking the semi’s horn.

Visit to the Farm

Visit to the Farm

Visit to the farm

Visit to the Farm

Now that you’ve seen the photos, what would you most like to do on a visit to the farm?  Use your journal and your imagination!

Categories: Science | Tags: , , , , , | 2 Comments

What Farmers want you to know about Safety During Harvest

Harvest season is in full swing throughout the midwest.  As those tractors, carts, wagons, combines, head wagons, semis, augers, and pick-ups move from field to field, here are a few things farmers want you to know about safety during harvest!

Safety During Harvest

We don’t like it any better than you do, but sometimes farm equipment must drive on the highway.  Dealing with the slow-moving machinery that produces our food is just part of eating!  First, stay back for the sake of your vehicle– you don’t want beans smacking your window and the farmer can’t see you very well anyhow.

Be patient.  Most farm equipment won’t be driving on the highway for a long way.  As soon as a back road is available, the tractor or combine is probably going to turn off.

When you are traveling on a back road, keep a close eye out.  If you see a pick-up or car with flashing lights at the top of a hill watch out!  This is the signal to warn you that a large or slow-moving machine is coming towards you on the road.   Slow down or even stop and get as far over on the shoulder as you can.  Don’t ignore flashing lights!

Some neighborhoods are built where a field used to be and are still surrounded by farm ground.  Many farmers are happy to talk to families and kids about the equipment they drive or what they are doing, but never approach a farmer while he is driving.  Wait until he has fully stopped before you approach your neighbor to ask a question!

And never play on parked equipment!  Farmers sometimes need to leave combines and carts in the field over night and come back to finish later, but these are not giant toys!  But if you ask nicely you just might get a chance to sit in the driver’s seat with the help of the farmer!

So from our farm family to yours, be safe!

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5 Steps to Combining Corn

Harvest is in full swing on Marshall farms!  Ride along with us to learn the 5 steps to combining corn!

For more videos from Marshall Farms, click here!

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Harvesting during the Drought

Harvest has officially started.  And we, like nearly everyone else, are leaving long strips of corn in the fields.

Harvesting during a drought

What is this all about?  Well, most farmers purchase crop insurance each spring.  Just like someone might buy insurance in case of a car accident or home fire, farmers insure crops in case of a Mother Nature disaster.  People hired by the insurance companies come out to look at the crops and see how bad the damages are.  Leaving strips in the middle of the field allows a farmer to get on with harvest while leaving a sample for testing by the companies.

Have you seen strips like this left in fields near you?

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Farming

Part of working on a farm is learning about plants, weeds, soil, and equipment.  Part of being a farmer is learning how to drive a tractor and fix a combine.  And part of farming is just plain old hard work.  These boys are picking up straw bales from the wheat field behind our house.  They pick up each bale and stack it on the trailer.  When the trailer is full they stack each bale in a semi trailer.  When the semi trailer is full they stack each bale in the shed.  They worked for three days on just this field.  All three days the temperature was above 100 degrees with a higher heat index.  All three days they started at 5:00, after they had worked their regular jobs.

farming

That is farming.

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Law of Supply and Demand Lesson Plan

harvesting wheat

Despite the wind and rain that kept us out of the wheat field in June, we have finished harvesting our crop!

harvesting wheat

But what happens after the combine cuts the wheat?  Great question  😉

The picture above show the combine unloading onto the cart.  We use the tractor and cart because of those huge wheels you see.  A semi drives on roads, but wheels on the tractor and cart can drive through fields  much better.  After the cart is full the tractor pulls it out to the road and unloads on the semi.  Then the semi drives back to the grain bins and unloads the grain into the bins.

And then what?

So glad you ask!  Then we sell the grain.  Have you ever clipped coupons or watched for sales on your favorite foods?  Have you ever purchased lots of something because it was a good price?  Well, grain prices change almost EVERY day and farmers are always watching for a good price!  Is it too cold in the states where wheat is growing?  Prices might go up because buyers believe the wheat will not grow well.  There will be less wheat and they want to be sure to get some!  If they really, REALLY want that wheat they will pay more to make sure they have it.

Is it sunny, warm, and just perfect in the states where wheat is growing?  Prices might go down.  People believe there will be lots of wheat.  Everyone will have wheat to sell and you can get wheat whenever you want it.  There is no need to pay a lot.

We call this the Law of Supply and Demand.  The amount of wheat we have is our “supply” of wheat.  “Demand” means how many people want it.  Lots of supply can mean low prices and not enough demand can do the same thing.  High prices come when there is a low supply and lots of demand.  American farmers help feed the world, so right now demand is pretty high.  Wheat prices often depend on weather– how well did wheat grow?  What is the supply?

When we can, farmers like to sell grain at high prices.  But we can’t always do this.  Sometimes prices stay low for long periods of time and farmers need money.  They have to sell their wheat for whatever price they can to pay for seeds for next year, diesel for the tractor, or to buy groceries for their families!

Sometimes farmers make choices to sell, thinking prices are good, but then prices go up the next day, week, or month.  It can be very difficult to predict the future!

Try this activity to see what its like to buy and sell grain like a farmer!  This website has a simple table so you can see what corn is selling for at three hog farms.  http://www.psfarms.com/missouri_corn_bids.asp  Pretend you have corn to sell.  Choose a time frame, such as two weeks, and check the website everyday to see what prices are.  Write them down in a notebook.  At some point during the two weeks pretend to sell your corn.  Make sure to continue recording until your time frame has ended.  Now, how did you do?  Did you sell at the best price?  Was it good?  Bad?  Did the Law of Supply and Demand affect prices?  Do you think this year’s drought will make prices go up or down?

*Note: you can also try this activity using produce from your gorcery store.  Take your notebook with you and jot down prices.  Do they go up or down?  What factors affect price?

Categories: Science | Tags: , , , , , , , , | 2 Comments

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