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Posts Tagged With: recipes

Little Help Holiday Recipe

Easy.  Fast.  Kid-Friendly.  Healthy.  Best snack ever!

I kid you not, the nutritionist at Hy-Vee said you could eat as much of this chocolate as you want.  So of course I bought the two ingredients necessary to make this snack, and upon discovering my children can make this almost completely on their own, we have made it for five different events.

It’s nutritious, fast, easy and kid-friendly.

Best. snack. ever.

First, buy chocolate.  Dark chocolate.

And while you’re at the store, get those little clementine oranges.  Some of you probably know them as Cuties.  And get diapers.  And probably eggs and maybe shampoo.  Just trying to help…

Easy.  Fast.  Kid-Friendly.  Healthy.  Best snack ever!

Melt the chocolate in a double broiler, microwave, or in a glass measuring cup hooked to the side of a pot by its handle for your own double-broiler-in-a-pinch.  Whatever works for you.  Just remember that water is the enemy of melted chocolate so make sure whatever you use is perfectly dry and that no water can splash into it while you’re working.  If you get water in the chocolate you will need to throw it out, which is tragic to say the least.

Then spread out a sheet of wax paper, peel the clementines, and remove the glass from the hot water if you are letting your kiddos do this.

Next, dip!

Easy.  Fast.  Kid-Friendly.  Healthy.  Best snack ever! Easy.  Fast.  Kid-Friendly.  Healthy.  Best snack ever!

They take an hour or so to set up on the counter, but if you put them in the fridge or in your freezing cold garage, they’ll be ready in minutes!

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Categories: Family, Food | Tags: , , , , , , | 2 Comments

Two Tips for Hard Boiled Eggs

I have soooooo many eggs right now.  Literally thirteen dozen in my fridge.  And more in the coop.  Of course, there will be more in the coop tomorrow and the day after, and the day after.

Two tips for hard boild eggs  {DaddysTractor.com}

Which means I’ll be forced to workout this afternoon so I can take my farm fresh eggs to the Y to sell.  But, it also means I’ll be pulling out all my tricks for using eggs!  We’ll eat them scrambled, as omelets, in quiche, as egg salad, but my family’s favorite is deviled eggs.  Which is great.  Except that hard boiled eggs can be such a pain!

Thankfully, I’ve learned a few things about the science of eggs.  Nearly all of it has been confirmed by the girls at the Y too, so you can be sure these will work!

First, use old eggs.  A fresh egg is “full”, making it difficult to separate the cooked egg from the shell, but an old egg has lost water through evaporation.  This creates an air pocket at one end of the egg.  You can test eggs by setting them in water.  If they lie flat, the eggs are fresh with no air pocket.  If one end floats up at a diagonal this egg is older and will work great for boiling or baking.  If the egg stands perfectly on end, well, you’ve held on to that one too long!!!

Two tips for hard boild eggs  {DaddysTractor.com}

Then place the eggs in a pot and cover them with cold water.  The water level should be at least one inch above the eggs.  Turn the heat on and allow the water to reach a rolling boil, then cover the pot with a lid and turn the heat off.  Set a timer for 12-13 minutes.

Two tips for hard boild eggs  {DaddysTractor.com}

This is important!  When the timer goes off, don’t ignore it!  Its okay to finish changing the baby’s diaper and all, but don’t think that no burning = no foul!  Cool the eggs quickly in cold water.  Once they’ve cooled to the touch lightly crack the entire surface of the egg.  Under cold, running water carefully find the film under the shell and peel the egg.  Try to find that air pocket and start there.

Two tips for hard boiled eggs.  {DaddysTractor.com}

If you are Martha Stewart or the Pioneer Woman and have a whole kitchen just for your food show, you will have a beautiful, smooth, perfect egg ready for deviling!

Two tips for hard boiled eggs.  {DaddysTractor.com}

If you are a crazed, homeschooling, foster parenting, goat caring, chicken wrangling, blogging mom who didn’t bother to test the eggs and then left them cooking for 45 minutes, you’ll probably end up with something not quiet that perfect.

Two tips for hard boiled eggs.  {DaddysTractor.com}

So that’s where my two best tips for hard boiled eggs come in.

First, let you kids peel the eggs so you can proudly show off your creations as something your adorable offspring accomplished.

Two tips for hard boiled eggs.  {DaddysTractor.com}

And second, cook twice as many as you need and make egg salad with the worst ones.

There ya go.  Two tips for cooking hard boiled eggs, from my home to yours. 😉

Categories: Animals, Science | Tags: , , , | 10 Comments

A Farm Lesson Plan; Who Grew My Soup

One of the great things about winter is going to farm conferences.  A few weeks ago we attended the MO Farm Bureau Young Farmer and Rancher conference.  Daddy and I learned lots from our seminars and speakers, but Brett probably had the most fun ;-).   He was finally old enough to join the grade school kids at the children’s seminars, provided by the Promotion and Education committee, directed by Diane Olson, Barbra Wilson, and Terribeth Spargo.  They came up with this fun farm lesson plan and Brett loved it.

The activities were based on the book, Who Grew My Soup, by Tom Darbyshire.

Who Grew My Soup, a Farm Lesson plan

Its a silly story with hilarious illustrations that look like something you’d create with an app on your iPad.  Basically this kid decides he’s not eating his healthy soup until he knows what’s in it.  So, because isn’t this what happens every time you declare war on vegetables, a hot air balloon (actually tomato) swoops down and carries him off to the fields where the soup was grown.

Farm Lesson Plan, Who Grew My Soup

Next they had the kids sort plastic food by plant part.  For example, the tomatoes in the soup are the fruit of plant, but carrots are the roots and corn and peas are the seeds.  This chart can get you started if you’re stuck with that one!

Farm Lesson Plan, Parts of the Plant we use for food

The kids also got to vote on their favorite kind of soup.  This, of course, would be a great thing to graph.  If we had more people (one hurdle for homeschooling!) I wanted to make a “live” graph where everyone used an actual can of soup to represent their vote and stack them on the floor as a bar graph.  If you try it, send me a picture please :-).

They ended the seminar by making their own Who Grew My Soup Mix.

Farm Lesson Plan, make your own soup

Ingredients
1/3 cup beef bouillon granules
1/4 cup dried minced onion
1/2 cup dried split peas (green and yellow if possible)
1/2 cup lentils (red and green for variety)
1/2 rice (white or brown but NOT instant)
1 cup tri-colored spiral pasta

Directions for Mix
Layer these ingredients in the order given into a 1 quart canning jar.  Pack each layer in place before adding the next ingredient.  Attach a gift tag with the following:

Soup Recipe
1 jar Who Grew My Soup mix
1 pound ground beef, browned and drained

Remove pasta from mix and set aside.  Place the remaining soup mix in a large soup pot.  Add 12 cups of water.  Bring to a boil.  Lower heat and simmer 45 minutes.  Add pasta and ground beef and simmer an additional 15 minutes.

Thanks so much to the P&E committee for such a fun seminar.  Especially when it comes to farm lessons, Brett prefers to learn from someone other than mom :-).  I mean really, what does she know about soup?!

Categories: Science | Tags: , , , , | 16 Comments

A Healthy Holiday Recipe!

You might think there isn’t much to do on a farm in the winter.  Well, you’d be thinking wrong!  Its bitterly cold today in Missouri, but there are some garden plants that don’t really care.  Spinach is one of my favorite veggies to grow year round.  All you need is a tray of dirt, your favorite spinach seeds, water and sunlight.  Oh!  And a spot indoors!

And then you need a recipe!

But let me say that just because my farm kids help grow the veggies doesn’t mean they’ll eat them!  So I created these green Christmas pancakes to entice my little ones to consume a bit more of those leafy greens.  It was an instant success!  So here’s to healthy holiday recipes!

These Healthy Christmas pancakes use spinach for a holiday green color!

 

Healthy Holiday Pancakes

Handful spinach leaves
3/4 cup buttermilk*
1/3 cup applesauce
1 teaspoon agave nectar or honey
1 egg
2 tablespoons oil
1 cup flour (I use 1/2 wheat, 1/2 white)
1 teaspoon baking powder
1/4 teaspoon baking soda
1/4 teaspoon salt

*If you don’t have buttermilk you can make your own by adding a teaspoon or so of lemon juice to plain milk and letting it set for about 5 minute.

Put spinach leaves in a blender, cover with buttermilk, applesauce, agave, egg and oil.  Blend until smooth.  In a mixing bowl combine remaining ingredients.  Add wet mixture to flour, stirring just until moist.  Add more flour if the mixture is too runny.  This will vary, based on how much spinach you use and how juicy the spinach is.  I also add about 1/4 cup of chocolate chips to mine at this point to distract my kiddos.  Then pour onto a griddle and cook as usual.  Enjoy some holiday baking without the gilt!

Categories: Family | Tags: , , , , , | 2 Comments

In Memory: Easy Chicken Nuggets!

The rooster’s time has come.  For months now he had been a happy, well-behaved bird.  But no more.  On Thursday he left a long red mark down my little girl’s arm, and on Friday he attacked my son.  So McChicken has become nuggets.  In his memory, here is the recipe for our favorite, easy chicken nuggets you can make at home.  Even if you have to purchase your chicken from the store :-).

Easy Chicken Nuggets

Weelicious Easy Chicken Nuggets

Categories: Animals, Family | Tags: , , , | Leave a comment

Pizza Recipe Using Produce from the Garden

Gardens are in full swing about now and gardening with your kids is a great way to learn about farming!  Are your tomatoes wilting in the heat no matter how much you water them?  Did squash bugs kill your cucumber plants and eat holes in your watermelons?  Did you plant sweet corn too late and have nothing but scraggly stalks to show for all your hard work?  These are problems farmers face each day.

But there are also great rewards to gardening with your kids– eating!  One of our family’s favorite ways to enjoy fresh veggies is the all-American favorite, pizza!  We grow cherry tomatoes and basil plants in our garden, but you can make up your own recipes, based on what you planted.

Pizza from the Gardengardening with kids, pizza from the garden

1 crust

mozzarella cheese

cherry tomatoes

basil plant

Start with a crust.  I love to bake a crust using the package mix from the grocery store, but you can buy pre-made crusts or use a homemade recipe.  Cook the crust with no toppings.

Add mozzarella cheese.  Lots of cheese.

Cut cherry tomatoes in half and arrange over the cheese.  Pull basil leaves off the plant, rinse, and arrange with tomatoes.

Grill the pizza over medium heat or cook in a 450 degree oven for 8-10 minutes or cheese is melty.

Eat and enjoy the fruits of your labors!

Categories: Science | Tags: , , , | Leave a comment

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